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of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
supports the nsa surveillance program. he says the program itself works in protecting america from terrorism and has what he calls a 99.99% batting average in being compliant. >> this whole tone of snooping and spying that we use i think it's horrible, it's a distortion and a smear and a slander of good patriotic americans. >> reporter: senator rand paul, by the way, says the constitutionality of the nsa program must be evaluated. steve? >> thank you very much. peter king went directly at rand paul, said basically he's lying about the program. and he's just breathless in defending it as michael hayden. where is the president? he doesn't go to pat for this. he's analyzing this and it's his program. from michael hayden he says "the washington post" publishes this story. look at the numbers. there's been 115 incidents, incorrectly entered. mistakes made. none intentional. so that's out of 61 million inquiries a compliance rate of 99.998. look beyond the numbers and the headlines. >> right. michael hayden has and i temple in the "usa today" today where he talks in an op-ed just trust u
of violence in america calls each of us to collectively resist all forms of violence in our society. in particular, black on black violence that disproportionately affects every facet of black life in america. we must learn to live together in peace or we will most surely die apart in our own neglect. on the other hand, reaction on twitter. allen west tweeted, who will the president of the united states identify with this time? so we're starting to see more reaction on both sides of the aisle. ainsley, steve, brian, back to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa c
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
wrote about in the "the washington post" this week. america's chronic overreaction to terrorism, we have created an economy of fear, an industry of fear, a national psychology of fear. al qaeda could have never achieved that on its own. we have inflicted it on ourselves. >> fundamentally, there are two sets of questions that apply in the war against terrorism. the one set of questions deals with the where's it going to happen, what's going to happen, and when is it going to happen. the other set of questions deals with what is it that our enemy, the terrorists, are trying to achieve? what are they trying to induce us to do? take a look at what's been happening over the past week. with a conference call, al qaeda has effectively shut down 20 u.s. embassies around north africa and the middle east. we just had the president of yemen here for a meeting with president obama. he goes back feeling wonderful about his new relationship with the president. next thing the president does is says in effect, sorry, but we don't trust you yemenis to protect your embassies so in effect we shut down our
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
of the united states of america siding with the generals. we have no credibility. we do have influence, but when you don't use that influence, then you do not have that influence. we could be cutting off the aid, the spare parts and maintenance of these military equipment that we've given the egyptians is important to their capabilities. >> wait -- >> tourism, economic assistance, business, the imf loan. there are many areas where we could exercise influence over the generals and we're not doing any of it and we're not sticking with our values. >> and yet when you argued earlier, trying as you say to give the military leaders a chance, you argued that to cut off u.s. aid to egypt might harm israel. others also add that once you cut off aid, you've lost any kind of leverage. there is nothing after you've cut u.s. aid. >> well, again, we thought that at that particular time that it was not the right thing to do because we wanted to give them an opportunity to get back on the path to democracy. obviously that's not the case. as i say, our interests, our values, there are consequences of failure --
. >> you next time? >> that's right. that's my new role in america. >> in all that matters. >> a panda family reunion in china. this adorable giant panda cub was reintroduced to her mother last week. she was born july 6th but taken away when her leg was hurt. >> on "cbs this morning." >> the executives at blackberry are considering selling off the company. it's being called a very lucrative move by six years ago magazine. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning" and good morning, norah. >> good morning to you charlie. >> lots of interesting stories this morning. we begin with this new concerns that al qaeda is on the move. the iraq al qaeda group has changed its name to the islamic state of iraq to show their growing ambition. >> and there are growing fears syria is to become the new haven for terrorists. they warn it could create the world's great eterror threat. lara logan, good morning. >> good morning, norah, good morning, charlie. >> how dangerous is al qaeda in syria and what are you worried about? >> dangerous enough for the deputy di
in a row is pretty suspicious and bank of america says they'll try to -- >> common practice, it happens constantly with young kids in that -- >> sad story. >> drinking red bull and coffee. >> yeah. >> that's just the culture? >> absolutely. >> but let's not in any way start to assign a bank or anybody else -- >> no, no, not a bank, just the culture of investment banking. >> and it's the culture of the competitive nature for college kids now trying to get jobs. it is, you bust a gut to try to get these, even unpaid internships, maybe not pulling three all-nighters. >>> the "new york daily news." dr. oz came to the rescue of a 23-year-old british tourist. the tourist was sitting near a fountain outside of this building, rockefeller center, when a taxi cab jumped the curb, trying to run down a bicyclist in what witnesses say was a foot of road rage. dr. oz heard the crash and went to the scene to assist the victim along with other first responders. reports say she lost part of one leg. apparently there was a plumber there, he used his belt as a tourniquet and that helped save her life. >>
last day on current tv. al jazeera america starts i guess on tuesday, but i'm not sure. >> al jazeera has a big house. >> stephanie: indeed. we will have a new television show -- we're on vacation the first week in september, but as soon as we know we'll tweet you out. and you can get the steph cast. [ bell chimes ] >> absolutely. go to stephaniemiller.com to find out how. >> stephanie: yes. in the meantime, guess who is here, our thursday buddy, our pal. ♪ karl >> stephanie: karl frisch, bullfightstrategies.com. ♪ frisch >> stephanie: good morning. >> good morning. i think i get to break the news, hence forth after your vacation, the show will be aired from jim's colonoscopy. >> stephanie: yes, and the rumor is that we're going to dog tv, but that rumor is incorrect. >> no, it is animal planet 6. >> stephanie: right. >> and they will just be sitting? our stead, feed them peanut butter, watch their mouths move. >> stephanie: karl frisch, we have to take a peak into right wing world, you know the rodeo clown incident -- >> yes. >> stephanie: it turned into a giant klan rally -- >>
why that's happening. because nobody in america would -- dan, good luck. we will see you soon. if it's way too early, it's "morning joe." stick around. the fix is next. >>> day of rage. egypt's unrest leads to hundreds of deaths and thousands of injuries prompting president obama to cancel a major military exercise. is there more the u.s. will do to stop the violence? plus, some new names headlining in the hawkeye state talk this weekend. but the spotlight still belongs to the superstars on each side. and another surprise headline on what the nsa is up to. an internal review shows the intel outfit broke its own rule thousands times. good morning from washington. it's friday, august 16th, 2013. and this is "the daily rundown." we're watching developing news out of egypt. the country bracing for more bloodshed today. tens of thousands of muslim brotherhood members and their supports are responding to calls for a day of rage. pouring into the streets to protest this week's brutal government crackdown. we're watching crowds demonstrators crossing a bridge through cairo. most likely tryin
to working on that and have an immigration bill that will really work for iowa and for america. [applause] .. >> businesses get it and now how important it is for the vitality of america and endorsed by the afl-cio, so labor understands it also. we thank both labor and business community for supporting the immigration bill. [applause] so, nick, you've been involved in ufcw, packing house workers and stuff, and it's been my experience as i toured them, and i didn't work in them like durbin did. he was a meat cutter in packing houses, but as i've traveled around, i see more and more of the latino community working in our packing houses and meat cutting places you represent. tell us about that. >> i'm with local cw222 from northwest iowa. we have a packing house in cherokee, iowa, and dakota city, nebraska. too-- together, that's roughly close to 5,000 employee, and 75% of them are latino. >> 75%? >> yes, yes, so 75% of the membership who we represent are latino and immigrant workers, so, again, good morning, ladies and gentlemen, of the panel and audience, senators, i'm honored to be here t
are putting a lot of mean into public education. in america we spend more money per child than any other industrialized country in the world and, yet, the results just really haven't increased. one of the things that we have to think about is fiscal transparency. we have to know as taxpayers exactly where our dollars are going, how they are being spent and what the return on investment is. >> is there sort of one size fits all or one size fits most about the ways money is not being spent well? i mean, i know you and the unions have not seen eye-to-eye. they are not your biggest fans and there's a lot of back and forth that has been going on. i know you've invited them to come to these town halls. >> yes. >> but is it about paying teachers more? is it about getting more technology into the classroom? what do we do about this? >> that is the entire thing that we have got to discuss is, you know, if we are going to put more investment into public education, then we have to make sure that that -- those additional dollars are producing results for kids. so, for example, when it comes to teach
for america, pete. first of all, give us a sense, the veterans are sitting there, disabled vets, listening to president obama basically point his finger at congress saying it's their fault that the sequester is in place. your benefits are safe now because of me. but next year maybe not. what was the response? >> well, i wasn't in the room. but they're effectively listening to a veiled threat. this is a president saying hey, your benefits are good to go now, but going forward, they might noting because of congress. and to me, you got to see through -- here is the guy who is supposed to be leading our nation and he's standing up not leading, but demagoguing and anyone who has followed this known it's been the president's insistence on raising taxes, unwilling to do the heavy lifting of getting rid of things raising taxes. >> eric: the president quotes wreckless across the board budget cuts. reckless? we're $16 trillion in debt. >> the reckless in the nature for the military in that hey, we're cutting critical programs, maintenance and training. there is definitely a reckless nature when itle
and ready for what will be a pivotal race in america's history and that is about getting everyone excited now, about what i hope will be that moment in 2017 when we all get to say, madam president, to hillary rodham clinton. >> all righty then. as for vice president joe biden, he's set to attend a major political event in iowa next month. the annual steak fry, you can't go, joe, known for attracting top tiered democrats considering a white house run. let's bring in nbc news political reporter kasie hunt in iowa over the weekend with details on these events. kasie, what struck you the most? where do you want to start? >> sort of deja vu all over again. i feel like the republicans never really stopped. didn't seem like -- rick santorum was actually campaigning essentially. he drove across the state in the same pick-up truck that he used in 2012. and he -- >> that's great. >> hit a pizza ranch, he went to blue bonny ice cream. >> you sound tired. was it boring? just admit it. was it boring? >> it was awful. >> no. we had -- it was great. >> you say it's deja vu all over again. contrived and
. >> good morning. >> it's the most controversial practice for america's largest police force, and now the nypd's stop and frisk tactic is under fire from a judge. mayor bloomberg says it saves lives. critics say it amounts to racial profiling. we're going to dive into the debate this morning. >>> also ahead, divorce is too often a blood sport these days, you know that, but murder? a former bank of america executive now stands accused of trying to kill his wife by hiring four hitmen, one of whom was his mistress. one was to take out his wife. now his wife and daughter are going to tell you why they both fear for their lives. >>> let me ask you a question, would you be willing to travel at hyper speed? the hyper loop will take you from l.a. to san francisco in just 30 minutes. that's just the beginning. how close is this to reality is the question this morning. >> good conversation about that. very, very cool. >>> first up, big news out of san diego. hannah anderson's father says she faces a slow healing process following her abduction. we're learning dramatic new details about hannah's
in the best town of america? you're right if you call sharon, massachusetts your home. that's according to to "money" magazine who just released it's list of the best places to live in the united states. let's start with the best. sharon, massachusetts, why is it the best? >> well, you'll see this throughout the towns that we have picked, economic strength, it's centrally located between providence, boston and route 128. so if that helped insulate it from the recession, it's unemployment rate is less than 5% which is 2.5 percentage rates below the national average right now. it's also one of the most diverse towns that we see, both economically, racially and ethnically. it has one of the biggest mosques in the new england area. and it is it used to be a summer resort and 40% of the place is open land. >> okay. so to be fair for all the cities in your choices, you also listed the downside of each town. what is the downside of sharon? >> like any place in the northeast, it's more expensive than the average town, but it's not quite as expensive as some of the areas around -- closer to bost
the kool-aid. you are all being loyal to obama, you're not being loyal to america. host: dennis off of twitter -- i want to point you to our newsmakers program that will appear sunday at 10:00 -- a member of the foreign affairs committee did and some of the discussions with reporters, he talked about russia and the nsa program that attracts mated data about american phone calls and e-mails. here's what he has to say. [video clip] >> the fact is we have approved the following of terrorist communications from overseas. even those communications that go into the united states. when it comes to phone calls of every single american, which is what we are talking about, they do not need to keep tabs on everyone of us and what we are doing in order to support a terrorist attack. host: newsmakers takes place tomorrow at 10:00. guest is a member of the foreign affairs committee. independent line, california. caller: one thing a lot of people are overlooking is is that i do not know if president obama or even many people in our government can really vouch for what is going on with these progra
, massachusetts. the town is number one on "money" magazine's new best small towns in america list for weathering the recession well and having a big lake and being close to both boston and providence. so close that you can commute to work in either city. it is also diverse. nine churches, seven synagogues and one of the largest mosques in new england. louisville, colorado, and vienna, virginia, round out the top three. >> bill: never heard of that city in massachusetts. nine churches in a town of 17,000? congregations are rather small, i would say because some people do not go to church at any rate. what we have -- very significant yesterday. there are two unrelated decisions regarding -- related to law enforcement that really were related. they weren't planned that way but they really do fit together and say something very important, i think, about law enforcement in this country. a lot of us have said for a long time that we went way overboard, you know. 10, 20 years ago. the last -- the previous generation about -- gotta be tough on crime. tough on law enforcement. crack down on crime. throw
90,000 acres. >> all that -- >> that's coming up next time. >> that's the way we roll in america. >> and "all that mattered" -- >> a panda family reunion in china. this adorable giant panda cub was reintroduced to her mother last week. she was born on july 6th but taken away when her leg was hurt. >> on "cbs this morning" -- >> the executives of blackberry is considering selling off the company. it's being calling a lucrative move by "six years ago ago." captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." good morning. >> good morning to you, charlie. >> we begin with this new concerns that al qaeda is on the move. the iraq al qaeda group has changed its name to the islamic state of iraq to show the growing ambition. >> and there are growing fears set to become the new haven in syria for that. u.s. officials warn it could be the world's greatest terror threat. lara logan is in washington. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, norah, good morning, charlie. >> good morning. >> how dangerous is al qaeda in syria? and what are u.s. officials concerne
on our phone calls. >> obama: america is not interested on spying ordinary people. we're focused on finding the information necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> bill: but it still remains to be said and shown how collecting information on every single phone call made in the united states by every single american who places the call, how long the call is and who they're calling, hard to see how that helps us find a terrorist in the middle east. remember last week this whole new terror scare that we found out about, took action, closed those embassies, nothing to do with this domestic spying program. that domestic spying program did not help one damn bit. i join republicans and democrats in congress. you've got people in congress like john conyers on the left, and james sensenbrenner on the right. you have dick durbin on the left and rand paul on the right all saying there have to be limits to this data collection, and there should be probable cause or some sufficient reason for going after those phone data on a particular person before you rando
-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) what you want to do is-- have you already enrolled? you're doing fine. what did that just do? select what? select the drop-down menu. it looks like you're already enrolled. oh, ok. oh. example here. so... don't panic. you're ready to make your payment. "submit." there it is. oh, my god! i really can't believe it. that's awesome. good for you. ha ha! ♪ and i would walk 500 miles >>> this would be good music for the moose when it comes up. welcome back t to the gif, it is friday, august 2nd, i'm chris cuomo. >> good morning everybody i'm kate bolduan. coming up in the show what happened in ariel castro's house for some ten years was horrific enough but what on earth was going on in his head that entire time i don't think anyone can know. we'll talk ab
down towards central america and got caught with their hands in the cookie jar come as far as selling drugs up through the country with the cia. is what they use to justify their war on drugs. they used a national marketing campaign by painting certain cities as being drug havens. they even had a so-called poster child, willie horton, back in a 1980s. -- in the 1980s. this was during a time when historic drug crime was at an all-time low. host: we will hear from another democrat, tim and mt. hope, arkansas. caller: good morning. finally we are seeing common sense in washington. this is a very important day. host: why do you say that? caller: we are starting to see -- we are starting to think straight. we are not thinking straight when we lock people up for smoking marijuana, especially when it is proven medicine. i've got glaucoma. i suffer from severe neck and back pain. if i was in any other state but state thatny other allows medical marijuana, i would be a patient driven in arkansas, i am a criminal. i've been arrested a few times for marijuana. it is always the same thing. they w
and ways to make these programs more transparent. >> i want to make clear that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. >> reporter: but it has happened. despite laws that forbid spying on americans. the "washington post" reports today that nsa leaker, edward snowden, provided secret internal odd kwreuts that reveal the nsa's own record of breaking privacy rules. >> we also found cases in which the nsa reported to no one because there's complicated rules about what to report and whom to report it and they found fairly significant incidents when they didn't think they had to tell anyone. >> reporter: according to documents obtained by the post, they found 2700 violations in a 12 month period. they say that is above the average and blames a variety of factors including changes in technology and shortcomings in procedures and foreign targets that roamed into the u.s. many of the privacy violations against americans appear unintended like tracking the wrong phone numbers due to a programming error, but other incidents are more serious. >>> the federal surveillance corp. that h
bolling. it is 5:00. this is "the five." the debate over racial profiling in america was reignited with the trayvon martin case and the uproar over stand your ground laws. now another law is coming under intense national scrutiny and that is stop and frisk. last week, a federal judge banned new york police department from using the crime fighting tool, saying it targets minorities, yesterday, trayvon martin's mother and the head of the naacp got in
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)